FAQ

Table of Contents

Project details, big picture
What is Folding@home? What is protein folding?

What is distributed computing?

Who “owns” the results? What will happen to them?

What has been “folded” so far, and how much have I folded?

What has the project completed so far?

Why not just use a supercomputer?

Can I run Folding@home on a machine I don’t own?

What happens if there is a suspected license (EULA) violation?

What are the minimum system requirements?

Why don’t you post the source code?

Running

Does Folding@home run on dual processor or multi-core machines?

Does Folding@home run on my graphics chip or GPU?

Does Folding@home run on my Sony Playstation 3 game system (PS3)?

Why should I update my Folding@home software to the current version?

I just finished a WU and now I got another for the same protein. Is there something wrong?

How do the results get back to you?

Can I download more than one unit at a time?

How long does it take to finish a work unit? How do you measure a work unit?

How can I make sure my results are being sent back and used? How can I tell how much work I’ve processed?

How do I manually adjust the priority of the Folding@home core?

Can I run Folding@home when SETI@home is running?

Are there any limits to how long my machine can take to finish a work unit (WU)?

Can I run the Linux FAH Client on FreeBSD?

What about OpenBSD?

What is simulation instability?

What if I turn off my computer? Does the client save its work (i.e. checkpoint)?

How can I configure the client using flags?

Statistics, teams, usernames

How do I choose a username?

How do I start a Team or how do I join a Team?

How can I change my username (donor name)?

How can I join/create a team?

I’m running multiple machines behind a firewall. Can they all have the same username?

Are there any characters I should avoid in a username?

How do you decide how much credit a work unit is worth? How do you determine how many points a work unit is worth?

How do you set the deadlines for the work units?

How can I get a copy of all of the current stats?

Misc

What do the pictures of proteins show?

Where did the logo come from?

Do you have web buttons that I can download to use with links to your site?

How much power/money does keeping a FAH running 24/7 on a computer use?

What about security issues?

Why no client version for IRIX, Solaris, OS-2, AMIGA, Commodore, Macintosh OS9, iPhone, Smart Phone, ARM chip, XBox, Wii, etc.?

What are you going to add in later versions of the software?

Errors

Networking problems

I’m behind a firewall. Can I use Folding@home?

I can’t see web pages on urls that start with http://fah-web.stanford.edu, such as the stats — what’s going on?

My client was assigned to the IP address 0.0.0.0. What’s up?

My client is constantly assigned to the IP address 171.64.122.121. What’s up?

Folding@home and Genome@home

What is the Genome@home project and how does it relate to the Folding@home project?

Project details, big picture

What is Folding@home? What is protein folding?

Folding@home is a distributed computing project, that very simply stated, studies protein folding and misfolding. Protein folding is explained in more detail in the scientific background section. It also helps us develop drugs to combat disease.

What is distributed computing?

Distributed Computing is a method of computer processing in which different parts of a program, or different portions of data, are processing simultaneously on two or more computers. We are able to use this approach to significantly accelerate our research. Folding@home is one of the largest, most powerful, and most widely distributed computing networks.

Who “owns” the results? What will happen to them?

Folding@home is run by an academic institution (specifically the Pande Group, at Stanford University’s Chemistry Department), which is a nonprofit institution dedicated to science research and education. We will not sell the data or make any money from it. Moreover, we will make the data available for others to use. In particular, the results from Folding@home will be made available on several levels. Most importantly, analysis of the simulations will be submitted to scientific journals for publication, and these journal articles will be posted on the web page after publication.

Following the publications of these scientific articles, we will make the raw data of the folding runs will be available to other researchers upon request. The data sets from some of our most prominent simulations are already publicly available. We’ve also strived to share our key technologies with other scientists, to assist their research as well.

What has been “folded” so far, and how much have I folded?

We’ve simulated a wide variety of proteins and other molecules. We divide the simulations into packets called “Work Units,” (WUs) each of which is sent to a computer for processing. We then assemble all the WUs from a project into a completed simulation. We keep many types of statistics of users and work accomplished in our Stats section. You can check your Individual stats, Team stats, and overall Project stats. Please also review the Results and Awards sections.

What has the project completed so far?

We have been able to fold several proteins into the 1.5 millisecond time range with experimental validation of our folding kinetics. This is a timescale a thousand times longer than any previous atomic-level simulation, and represents a fundamental advance over previous work. We are now simulating important proteins used in structural biology studies of folding as well as proteins involved in disease. We’ve been able to perform detailed simulations of many of these proteins at biologically-relevant timescales, giving us insights that had previously been unobtainable. We’ve also identified several potential drug candidates which may be able to fight Alzheimer’s, cancer, and infection by viruses. Peer-reviewed scientific papers detailing our results are posted on our Results page, and many of them are published in top journals such as Science, Nature, PNAS, and JMB. These publications are highly detailed and often technical, but summaries of their findings can be found on Results page as well as the Folding@home article on Wikipedia.

Why not just use a supercomputer?

Modern supercomputers are essentially clusters of hundreds of processors linked by fast networking. The speed of these processors is comparable to (and often slower than) those found in PCs! Supercomputers are not only very expensive to operate, but they are often simultaneously shared by many different research groups, and it is a challenge to scale a molecular simulation to all of their processors. Protein folding dynamics is statistical in nature, so a single long simulation from a supercomputer would not be sufficient to fully understand the folding process. Folding@home is one of the most powerful computing systems on the planet, and we use novel methods to utilize its network to statistically analyse the dynamics of protein folding. Hence, the calculations performed on Folding@home would not be possible by any other means! This is possible since PC processors are now very fast and there are hundreds of millions of PCs sitting idle in the world.

Can I run Folding@home on a machine I don’t own?

Please only run Folding@home on machines you either own or on which you have the permission of the owner to run our software. If there is any doubt (eg you want to run on computers at work), we suggest you get written approval (eg get your superior to sign a letter giving authorization); we have found that written documentation of this sort is important if there is ever any dispute of whether permission was indeed granted. Please do not assume that permission is granted by the owner. Any other use of Folding@home violates our end user license agreement (EULA), and just isn’t a good idea in general.

What happens if there is a suspected license (EULA) violation?

We will attempt to contact the donor if there is some suspicion of a EULA violation. Many donors use their email as their donor name and this is helpful. If do not have any information on hand and we have been presented with a sufficiently strong case that there was a EULA violation, we will zero the points of the donor and not allow clients to run under the name of that donor. This decision can be reversed if there is sufficient information to exonerate the donor. The donor should contact one of the Pande Group members or Forum Moderators at our forum to get in touch with us in such a situation.

What are the minimum system requirements?

All computers can contribute to Folding@home. However, if the computer is too slow (e.g. wasn’t built in the last 3-4 years or so), the computer might not be fast enough to make the deadlines of typical work units. A Pentium 4 or newer equivalent computer (with SSE) is able to complete work units before they expire.

Folding part time (less than 24 hours a day) will increase the minimum system requirements to make the deadlines.  In this case, it is up to the donor to determine how many hours a day are required to fold and still meet the deadlines with each computer.

Why don’t you post the source code?

Most of the critical parts of FAH are publicly available. The Tinker and Gromacs source codes can be downloaded and run. Unlike many computer projects, the paramount concern is not functionality, but the scientific integrity, and posting the source code in a way that would allow people to reverse engineer the code to produce bogus scientific results would make the whole project pointless. However, we stress that the vast majority of our code is already open source. We have an Open Source FAQ with more details.

Running

Does Folding@home run on dual processor or multi-core machines?

Yes it can. Our V7 client will automatically set this up by default. Folding@home was one of the first projects to utilize multi-core processing for distributed computing. This additional power significantly accelerates our research, allowing us to complete our simulations in a few months when it would otherwise take several years. In return, we award additional points to donors who run Folding@home on these multi-core machines. See the High Performance and Passkey FAQs for further details.

Does Folding@home run on my graphics chip or GPU?

Yes it can. Our V7 client will automatically set this up by default. Folding@home was the very first distributed computing project to utilize these specialized chips for distributed computing or for molecular dynamics simulations. For certain types of calculations, we’ve seen GPUs give us a 20-30x speedup over their CPU-based counterparts. See the GPU and High Performance FAQs. We’ve heard a few reports that folding on GPUs can impact system performance, and we are currently working towards measures to resolve the issue.

Does Folding@home run on my Sony Playstation 3 game system (PS3)?

We had a PS3 client from March 2007 until November 2012. FAH was the first to utilize PS3s for distributed computing. Life with Playstation is no longer available, so the PS3 client is no longer supported.

Why should I update my Folding@home software to the current version?

We are continuously improving the Folding@home software and adding new features. We release new versions to fix bugs reported by the users to help make the project run as smoothly as possible.

I just finished a WU and now I got another for the same protein. Is there something wrong?

No, everything is fine. Each Work Unit is identified using four numbers, in the format: Project(Run, Clone, Generation). Each WU gives us additional information about the dynamics of that protein, so it is important to us. We often need thousands of WUs per protein to fully understand its folding process. Unlike some other distributed computing projects, (SETI@home for example) our Work Units are processed to completion only once. It would therefore be extremely unusual to be reassigned the exact same WU.

How do the results get back to you?

Your computer will automatically upload the results to our server each time it finishes a work unit, and download a new work at that time.

Can I download more than one unit at a time?

The algorithm we use works best if everybody downloads one work unit at a time, and checks back after each unit is completed. Therefore no option to download multiple units is available.

However, it is possible to work on multiple WUs at once; our latest client may do this by assigning each WU to different processing components in your computer. Folding@home differs from many other projects in that it is important for WUs to be completed in a timely manner. It is far better to get a single WU done at full speed than to complete two WUs at half speed. The V7 client may be very helpful in setting up the proper configuration that best fits your system.

How long does it take to finish a work unit? How do you measure a work unit?

This varies, of course, on the speed of the computer and the size of the protein under study. Depending on the protein and the properties studied, different size work units may be used. The Project Summary page has information on particular proteins’ sizes and the deadlines allotted for completion.

How can I make sure my results are being sent back and used? How can I tell how much work I’ve processed?

To find out data that has been reported back you can check the Stats page for Individual stats, Team stats, and overall Project stats. This usually updates at the top of the hour. If your computer is returning data, you should see your username there along with the number of work units completed. If your name isn’t there, then either it hasn’t finished a unit yet (this can take a few days, or even longer with an older computer) or the list hasn’t been updated yet. Check back in an hour or two, and it should be there . . . as long as you remember correctly what you typed in for your donor user name. :)

How do I manually adjust the priority of the Folding@home core?

The work is done by the fahcore, not the client process, so changing the priority on the client has no impact on performance. The priority for the fahcore is set to “Idle” by default (but displays as normal in Task Manager). The client is already designed to use all spare CPU cycles, so changing the Windows priority is unnecessary. If the FAH client is competing with another process running at “Idle” such as a background AV scan, there is a client option to run at a “Low” priority.

Can I run Folding@home when SETI@home is running?

Yes, SETI@home and other distributed applications can be run alongside Folding@home, provided you have enough system memory. Some programs, including SETI@home run at a higher priority than Folding@home, which prevents FAH from progressing if it is run at the same time. If you notice the FAH client is not progressing, you can fix this by enabling the “Slightly Higher Priority” Option in the FAH client. This can be done through the advanced options page for the Windows GUI client, or by running the Console client with the -config switch.

Note: FAH work units are time sensitive, while work units from other projects typically are not time sensitive. Therefore we strongly recommend giving the FAH client a higher priority, or to dedicate a processor core to FAH while allowing other projects to use the remaining computer resources.

Are there any limits to how long my machine can take to finish a work unit (WU)?

Yes. Work Units are serial in nature. When a completed WU is sent back, a new work unit is generated from those results. This must happen many times over within each project (group of work units). A generation 1 work unit must be turned in before a generation 2 work unit is created and sent out.

To keep these generations moving along, we have to set expiration deadlines in the event a work unit is not uploaded in a timely manner (lost, deleted, whatever). These unfinished work units “expire” and are reassigned to new machines. You will still receive credit for all WUs completed and uploaded prior to the Timeout (formerly preferred deadline). However, after the Timeout, your contribution is not as useful scientifically because another copy of that work unit had to be sent out to another contributor. Even if you eventually complete the work unit, that other contributor still had to process duplicate work to assure the science moves forward. And it would be unfair not to also credit that second contributor.

Even so, full credit is given up until the Deadline (formerly Final Deadline). After the Deadline has expired, the client will automatically discard the work unit and download new work. If you have trouble completing work units before the Timeout (formerly Preferred Deadline), it is recommended to either run the FAH client more hours each day, or to run the client on a faster computer.

As we move to larger and longer WUs, we will extend the expiration time as needed. Deadlines vary on the order of a few days to a several weeks, depending on the nature of the WU. Turn in a work unit just before the deadline is not the goal. It is most helpful to the project to return work units as quickly as possible. And how these deadlines are determined is explained a few answers below.

Can I run the Linux FAH Client on FreeBSD?

Yes, the Linux FAH client will run on the Linux Emulator for FreeBSD.

Install Linux Emulator/Linux_base from FreeBSD CD or website. Use port linux_base-f10 or newer (2.6.16+ kernel) in FreeBSD version 8.

Check that Linux binary compatibility is enabled:

% kldstat | grep linux

You may have to set linux_enable=”YES” in /etc/rc.conf

Start the Linux emulation if you haven’t rebooted yet…

% kldload linux

Download the Linux folding console (FAHxConsole, where x is the version number) and cd to the directory. Flag the binaries as Linux ELF executables (both fah client, and fahcores).

% brandelf -t Linux FAH*.exe

Specify the “-freeBSD” flag when you run the client.

% cd /usr/local/share/foldingathome

% chmod +x FAH6.34-Linux.exe

% ./FAH6.34-Linux.exe -freeBSD

(Thanks to “gotti” and “hyperlife” for the suggestions.)

What about OpenBSD?

It works almost as easily as FreeBSD (see the FAQ entry just above). Just follow these steps:

1. Install /usr/ports/emulators/redhat/base from ports on 3.4 or later. If you’re on an earlier version, or just prefer packages, install redhat_base-8.0p2.

2. Set up a script that redirects the brandelf call to elf2olf, so that core binaries can be marked properly. Read more about this on the Folding Forum, or simply set up on your own:

  1. !/bin/sh

elf2olf -v -o linux $3

In either case, make sure the brandelf script is executable and in the path of the user running FAH.
3. Make sure to use the Linux Console version B, as version A will coredump.

4. When running the client, use the -freeBSD switch, so that it will automatically mark core binaries properly.

Thanks to Alex Kirk for the OpenBSD info.

What is simulation instability?

The simulation of molecular motion involves a great deal of computation. Each run consists of a number of time steps (each very small). At each time step, the position of the various atoms is calculated and updated, based on a number of factors. Sometimes, the simulation enters into a state that is not legal (i.e. atoms are too close, bonds are in impossible angles, etc.). At times like this, the Core exits, and information is uploaded to the server. The client will then get another assignment. If your computer is stable, then you haven’t done anything wrong. On unstable computers, it is possible that the simulation instability was brought on by a fault of the system rather than something intrinsic to the work unit. Because of this, a work unit may be sent out again at some time if it is returned as having run into instability. In a given project, we expect a small percentage of units to encounter legitimate instability.

What if I turn off my computer? Does the client save its work (i.e. checkpoint)?

Periodically, the core writes data to your hard disk so that if you stop the client, it can resume processing that WU from some point other than the very beginning. With the Tinker core, this happens at the end of every frame. With the Gromacs core, these checkpoints can happen almost anywhere and they are not tied to the data recorded in the results. Initially, this was set to every 1% of a WU (like 100 frames in Tinker) and then a timed checkpoint was added every 15 minutes, so that on a slow machine, you never lose more that 15 minutes work.

As proteins become more complex and run longer, it is better to have more frames in a WU so that you don’t lose so much progress if you have to restart – - hence WUs that have 400 frames instead of 100. That still doesn’t take the speed of the machine into account. A fast machine completes a frame in a few minutes while a slow one may take hours, and the donor with the slow machine still doesn’t want to lose 99% of those “hours” yet the fast machine doesn’t really want the overhead of writing the checkpoints every “few minutes” – - and neither of them wants the upload time associated with results containing many frames.

Starting in the 4.x version of the client, you can set the 15 minute default to another value (3-30 minutes).

Thanks to Bruce Borden for this FAQ entry.

How can I configure the client using flags?

Please see the Configuration FAQ.

Statistics, teams, usernames

How do I choose a username?

To check if a name is already being used, use this search tool.

Type your name above (where it says “YourName”) to see if that user name is already being used. You can also choose not to have a username and just donate your CPU time anonymously (user name = anonymous).

You may choose any name you like, as long as it contains only letters or numbers (to insert a space, you may use the underscore “_” character). If you choose your email address as your username, we will use the full email address but NOT print the full email address. Instead, just the part before the @ sign will be used in any stats listing, etc. User names are also case sensitive.

How do I start a Team or how do I join a Team?

There are many teams already folding for the project. One of those teams may have lead you here. To join that team, simply enter their team # in to the client setup when you install the client. Or you can start a new team using the Create a Team page linked from the Stats page.

How can I change my username (donor name)?

The simplest way to change your username is to go to the Configure window (click the Configure button on the upper left corner of the screen). You can change your username at any time. However, old work units will remain credited to the old username.

How can I join/create a team?

To create a team, please fill out this form. To join a team, just enter the team number at the first time you run the client. You can also put the team’s number in the Configure window of the V7 client.

I’m running multiple machines behind a firewall. Can they all have the same username?

Yes. They can all have the same name.

Are there any characters I should avoid in a username?

Yes. We strongly recommend sticking to just letters, numbers and underscore. Right now, we reserve the characters # ^ ~ |. # is used for firewall differentiation (see above). We want to save ^ | and ~ for other problems which might come up. Also, don’t put spaces in your username; please use some character like “_” instead. Finally, please note that usernames are case sensitive, so “Dave” and “dave” and “dAVE” are all different usernames.

How do you decide how much credit a work unit is worth? How do you determine how many points a work unit is worth?

We have a single benchmark machine, its most important component is its processor: a Intel(R) Core(TM) i5 CPU 750 @ 2.67GHz. The machine’s OS is Linux. Here are the steps that we use to determine points for a project:

  1. Take a WU from a project and run it on the benchmark machine until it finishes.
  2. Measure the time it took to complete. Base credit awarded for the WU is then just a scaling factor multiplied by this time.
  3. The timeout and deadline values are also simple functions of the time it took to complete. These are set primarily to give a donor a reasonable amount of time to finish a WU, but short enough so that any WU that gets sent out but not processed (e.g. donor quits FAH, forgets to re-start that WU, their computer dies, etc) can be retrieved and sent out again in a reasonable amount of time. Thus these values are set depending on what kind of hardware a project is being run on (uniprocessor, SMP, GPU) and how long the WU took to finish on the benchmark machine.
  4. The k-factor, a coefficient in awarding bonus points, is currently set to a baseline value of 0.75, but may vary depending on the scientific value of a project.

The Folding@home software on your computer calculates Total Points as follows:

final_points = base_points * max(1, sqrt( k * deadline_length / elapsed_time))

Note that the max(1, …) ensures that final_points are never lower than base_points, deadline_length is the deadline aka final deadline, and elapsed _time is the length of time from when the WU was assigned, to when it was uploaded, including transit time.   Deadline_length and Elapsed_time are measured in days to one decimal point.

PPD is calculated as follows:

PPD = 14.4 * base_points * max(1, sqrt( 14.4 * k * Expiration / TPF)) / TPF

Note that TPF is in minutes, in decimal form, not time format.

Note that GPU projects are now being benchmarked on the same machine, but using that machine’s CPU. By using the same hardware, we want to preserve our goal of “equal pay for equal work”. Our GPU methods have advanced to the point such that, with GPU FAHCore 17, we can run any computation that we can do on the CPU on the GPU. Therefore we’ve unified the benchmarking scheme so that both GPU and CPU projects use the same “yardstick”, which is our i5 benchmark CPU.

Please note that the very concept of a reference machine will mean that some WU benchmarking will vary from the performance on your machine. Even between P4s, there are significant differences in architectures over the years. Moreover, variations between FAH WUs can also lead to differences in benchmarking points.

Our goal is consistency within a given definition of a reference machine setup (described above), but beyond that the natural variation from machine to machine and WU to WU will never allow any point system to perfectly reflect what you get on your machine. See also the Points FAQ

How do you set the deadlines for the work units?

Each work unit is benchmarked on a dedicated Intel(R) Core(TM) i5 CPU 750 @ 2.67GHz. For most work units (although there may be exceptions, described in the next paragraph), we apply this equation:

timeout = 20 * (daysPerWU) + 2
deadline = max(30* (daysPerWU) + 2,10)

where daysPerWU is the number of days it took to complete the unit. The “+2″ days is there to give an additional buffer for fast WUs (to allow for servers down, etc). If 30*daysPerWU is less than 10 days, we set the deadline to 10 days, as a minimum time for all projects. The timeout is the time at which the WU is resent to another client and the deadline is the last time that we will give stats credit for the WU.

Occasionally, deadlines may be set shorter or longer than the above calculation indicates, but the reason for having deadlines at all is that the sooner we get back work units, the sooner we can put the results to good use. Also, different projects have different requirements server-side and may require shorter or allow longer deadlines (e.g. “pfold” calculations can often be run without any deadlines, whereas MREMD calculations work best with very tight deadlines). The assignment server does take machine performance into account in making assignments, thereby allowing slower machines to receive more appropriate work units.

How can I get a copy of all of the current stats?

Please feel free to download http://fah-web.stanford.edu/daily_user_summary.txt or http://fah-web.stanford.edu/daily_team_summary.txt These files are updated every 3 hours. Please DO NOT run a crawler on our cgi pages. Such actions will result in your IP being permanently banned.

Misc

What do the pictures of proteins show?

We use several representations for showing proteins, including all-atom, stick, and Richardson cartoon representations. The colors are used to highlight specific parts (but that may be specific atoms, atom types, or structural characteristics, depending on the context). To learn more, Wikipedia has some nice articles about this:

Where did the logo come from?

Our logo is an abstract representation of our goal: to go from the protein sequence encoded in the genome to the protein’s structure. The double helix on the left of the logo denotes the genome (DNA is a double helical molecule) and the arrows on the right are representations of protein structure (beta sheet structure is often drawn as ribbons with arrows).

Do you have web buttons that I can download to use with links to your site?

How about this? (thanks to RPH IV)

FAH Logo

How much power/money does keeping a FAH running 24/7 on a computer use?

Roughly, a CPU uses about as much power (watts) as a typical light bulb. Although power supplies on most computers are rated at 400 watts, average usage is lower. On average, a Pentium-type computer uses about 100 watts (if the monitor is off). So, the daily difference between off and running FAH is about 24×100 = 2.4 kWh. At $0.15 per kWh ( from PG&E here in California), this works out to about $0.36 per day. In general, lighting and climate control use a much larger share of household power than computers do. So the best bet for cutting costs and conserving energy would be to turn off lights, turn off your computer monitors (which use more power than a CPU), and turn down the heat.

What about security issues?

We have worked very hard to maintain the best security possible with modern computer science methodology. Our software will upload and download data only from our data server here at Stanford. Also, we only interact with FAH files on your computer (we don’t read, write, or transmit any other files, as we don’t need to do so and doing so would violate our privacy policy). The Cores are also digitally signed (see below) to make sure that you’re getting the true Stanford cores and nothing else.

How is this possible? We take extensive measures to check all of the data entering your computer and the results we send back to Stanford with 2048 bit digital signatures. If the signatures don’t match (on either the input or the output) the client will throw away the data and start again. This ensures, using the best software security measures developed to date (digital signatures and PKI in version 3.0), that we are keeping the tightest possible security. Finally, the clients are available for download only from this web site (or in certain cases, also from our commercial partners such as Sony, NVIDIA, and ATI), so that we can guarantee the integrity of the software. We do not support Folding@home software obtained elsewhere and prohibit others to distribute the software.

Why no client version for IRIX, Solaris, OS-2, AMIGA, Commodore, Macintosh OS9, iPhone, Smart Phone, ARM chip, XBox, Wii, etc.?

We’ve been deluged by requests for other versions. Due to limited resources, we can only support a few client versions. We try to pick operating systems and hardware types which are likely to be popular with donators, that we can suitably support in house, and that will perform well on the scientific calculations. We do support BSD via its Linux emulation layer (see above).

What are you going to add in later versions of the software?

A good place to hear about new versions, beta versions, etc., is Vijay’s blog, i.e. the Project News page, and the Folding Support Forum.

Errors

If you encounter any errors, please report them on the Folding Support Forum. The volunteers there may be able to help you resolve the issue.

Networking problems

I’m behind a firewall. Can I use Folding@home?

Yes. You can configure your Firewall or Proxy server from the V7 client. Press the Configure button, and click the Proxy server tab. Then enter the proxy information into the text fields.

I can’t see web pages on urls that start with http://fah-web.stanford.edu, such as the stats — what’s going on?

If one accesses the stats too often (eg one is running a bot or automatic script), our web server detects this and bans the IP in order to prevent a single person from taking too much bandwidth from everyone else. If this has happened to you, please make a post in our forum noting this issue and one of the Pande Group or Moderators will look into this issue.

My client was assigned to the IP address 0.0.0.0. What’s up?

From time to time, we may not have work that matches the requirement of every platform. When that is true, we will not supply you with duplicated work that really isn’t needed. We’d rather have some clients idle and repeatedly rechecking for new work than busy for long periods working on something that doesn’t need to be completed. Even though your computer may see occasional idle periods, we still value your donations. If this continues for an extended period of time, be sure to ask for help in the Forum because that’s not normal.

My client is constantly assigned to the IP address 171.64.122.121. What’s up?

This is generally very rare, but when it does happen, this is the sign of a more serious error or issue. Please make a post in our forum noting this issue and one of the Pande Group or Moderators will look into this issue. This is part of the FAH safeguards to try to keep the servers working well for client machines that are behaving normally.

Folding@home and Genome@home

What is the Genome@home project and how does it relate to the Folding@home project?

Genome@home was another distributed computing project from the Pande Lab, officially concluded on April 15, 2004. Its goal was protein design and associated applications. One central application of ours for protein design is the creation of large libraries of designed protein sequences, in a sense “redesigning” or “reverse-engineering” an existing Genome (hence the name “Genome@home”). Another application of protein design is to understand why proteins fold and why they misfold and aggregate. This is a central question of Folding@home and directly relates to our study of protein folding and misfolding, as it is related to misfolding-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s, ALS, and Huntington’s disease. You can find more details at http://genomeathome.stanford.edu

For More Information, Please See:

Last Updated on December 27, 2013, at 12:39 PM

Add your computer's power to over 327,000 others that are helping us find cures to Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and many cancers ...

... in just 5 minutes.

Step 1.

Download protein folding simulation software called

Folding@home

.

Step 2.

Run the installation. The software will automatically start up and open a web browser with your control panel.

Step 3.

Follow the instructions to Start Folding.

Stanford University

will send your computer a folding problem to solve. When your first job is completed, your computer will swap the results for a new job.

Download the protein folding simulation software that fits your machine.

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Installation guide